A Short History of Junkers Camp, Bettenhausen, KasselDonald F. McGonigal, UNRRA, 1947 (monograph)

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and changed one or two times a week. There is a shower-room with hot water at the disposal of the DPs at all times... Refuse and garbage are collected in large outdoor garbag containers and taken away to a municipal dump daily. The DPs are clean and the condition of the camp and quarters is very satisfactory."

On September 15th the doctor reported that refuse and garbage was not being taken away regularly, and even now, the Germans have to be checked frequently on this point. On the same date Dr. van Ackers reported the completion of a second shower-room, bit added that the showers were closed because of lack of fuel.

The camp was inspected on August 18th by Captain Oscar A. Nelson, MC Medical inspector, who wrote in a letter of that date to the team Director that "In general this camp was very satisfactory."

Camp maintenance and repair was the responsibility of Mr. Pilaraki who was also the leader of the Poles. He was very energetic and efficient and supported by Pfc John Hetrick, who obtained much building material, extensive repair work was carried out.

Employment.[1]

In a report dated July 29th Dr. van Ackers wrote about the staff of the hospital which at that time numbered 27, as follows:-

"This personnel (except Melle Deville and Dr. van Ackers who are UNRRA) is volunteer and not paid. They work at least ten hours a day without any other advantage than to have their meals at the hospital. We should have some cloth, shoes and a regular ration of cigarettes for these people devoting themselves to the service of the sick while they could likve in the camp like the other DPs, resting, swimming, dancing etc..."

Camp workers were later placed on the Burgomeisters payroll and given an extra cigarette ration. On Novenber 2nd, Miss Tabard reported that

"Some 80 persons are working outside center with American units in various capacities, such as common laborers, mechanics, secretaries, cooks, house maids etc. Others numbering approximately 300 are employed inside the camp as, administrative personnel, foresters, drivers, mechanics, carpenters, laborers, etc."

Woodcutting.

When one considered the fearful fanfare of reports, district-wide meetings, graphs, orders, and the full-time assignment of field officers,

which


[1]Section title indented in original.
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