A Short History of Junkers Camp, Bettenhausen, KasselDonald F. McGonigal, UNRRA, 1947 (monograph)

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considerable delay in establishing alternative procedure, he sugg­ested that the camps make a final requisition for supplies for six months. This the camps did, including Junkers, and some of them had been notified to call for their six months' supplies when the whole arrangement was quashed by some higher echelon, either Army or UNRRA, it is not clear which.

There was a long delay before the new medical supply pro­cedure went into effect, and in the meanwhile shortages developed which in many cases were never met through official channels in 1946 because of the delays and inadequacies of the new procedure, which in its set up and functioning was too complicated to describe in detail here. One of the serious lacks was in vaccine and serums for innoculations. Mr. J. Westerman, Field Supervisor for the Wies­baden area, brought back a supply of small pox vaccine from Paris and contributed some to this area, and it is believed that Mr. Gold­stein also obtained[1] some when in Paris on leave, but the usual proced­ure, which Junkers camp was included, was to buy serums at Marburg from the Germans for cash.

Captain Smiley, the DP Officer at that time, took advantage of the visit of a high-ranking officer from USFET in October, to bring to his attention the extremely unsatisfactory medical supply situation in the camps and for that purpose arranged an interview with Dr. van Ackere of Junkers and Dr. Tauber of Merxhausen who explained the sit­uation and documented their statements with copies of requisitions and inventories. Possibly because of this intervention, and probably because of the efforts of the District Medical Officer, Dr. Cooney, conditions improved somewhat the latter part of the year, although small pox vaccine was not received through official channels by Junkers until February 1947.

During all this period, the situation in Junkers Camp was

not


[1]
Corrections on page 38
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